Cori Thorstad

“Gratification of an innocent Curiosity”: Resistance to Sexual Limitations on Women in Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina, or Love in a Maze

Bio:

Cori Thorstad (she/her) is a fourth year English Honours student at the University of Saskatchewan. Her main areas of interest are representations of gender, women’s literature, feminism, and decolonization. She is also the current president of the English Undergraduate Society. 

Abstract:

Eliza Haywood’s Fantomina, or Love in a Maze explores the tactics an aristocratic woman uses in the eighteenth century to act on her sexual desires within a world that does not allow for it. In so doing, Haywood exposes how a lack of freedom to explore sexuality harms women. Although Fantomina gains some agency and sexual freedom through her use of disguise, she must sacrifice her identity as an aristocratic woman in order to pursue her desires. Fantomina thus exhibits the limits and the consequences that often befall women because society restricts their freedoms in ways that it does not for men.


 

Dana Kasdorf

Resisting Racialized Narratives: Nancy's Visceral Impression in William Faulkner's "That Evening Sun"

Abstract:

Instead of reinforcing the racialized narrative in which black identity is submerged by a collective, white American identity, Faulkner calls attention to black identities who refuse to be submerged, particularly Nancy in “That Evening Sun.” This short story demonstrates how the Southern Gothic explores fears of real lived experiences, including family ties, human violence, and discrimination, rather than fears of the unknown. 


 

Ashley Lekach

Academic Libraries, UX (User Experience), and the Need for Accessibility in Academia

Bio:

Ashley Lekach is an English Student from rural Saskatchewan. She hopes to continue her education after her undergrad degree. She is working towards pursuing a career in either creative writing or library sciences.

Abstract:

Non-traditional students have been overlooked by traditional libraries in terms of accessibility. Traditional libraries tend to invest resources in collection and admin procedures, while modern libraries emphasize services and ease of use, and promote empathy towards the user base by adapting to needs. This paper explores the significance of such adaptations as they reflect a necessary approach, since libraries are not the only place one can access information. I argue that modern libraries enact the philosophy that academia should not reflect an elitist/ableist approach, and that the changes in academic libraries reflect the changing attitudes of the academic community.