Chelsea Hill

The Representation of Women in Fairy Tales from Marie de France to the Brothers Grimm

Bio:

Chelsea Hill is a fifth-year English Honours student at the University of Saskatchewan and an associate editor for the Humanities and Fine Arts Section of USURJ (University of Saskatchewan Undergraduate Research Journal). Her academic interests include children’s literature and the representation of women in literature and art, especially the objectification of dead and silent women. In her (albeit little) free time, she enjoys reading for fun (!), painting, and playing video games.

Abstract:

This paper views the lais of Marie de France as early literary fairy tales and compares them to the popular tales of the Brothers Grimm. By analyzing several of Marie de France’s lais and the Grimms’ “Cinderella” and “Rapunzel,” I examine the restrictive feminine ideals placed on women in tales from the Brothers Grimm. Conversely, Marie de France’s tales feature female protagonists that demonstrate agency and autonomy.


 

Miguel Dela Pena

Aemelia Lanyer, Ben Jonson, and the True Lineage of the English Country House Poem

Abstract:

This paper explores the English country house poem’s origins through its earliest examples, Lanyer’s “The Description of Cooke-Ham” and Jonson’s “To Penshurst.” It argues that the difference scholars cite to dismiss Lanyer’s influence despite her precedence is exactly what puts her in dialogue with Jonson, and therefore the entire genre.


 

Cara Schwartz

From Fear to Opportunity: The Napoleonic Wars in Maria Edgeworth’s Belinda and Jane Austen’s Persuasion

Bio:

Cara Schwartz is a fourth year Double Honours student majoring in English and Studio Art. She lives in Saskatoon with her husband Caleb and their two dogs. She particularly enjoys Victorian novels and speculative fiction but loves reading of any kind. 

Abstract:

Maria Edgeworth’s Belinda and Jane Austen’s Persuasion capture two separate images of British nationalism. However, scholarly research has failed to recognize the correspondence of the date of these novels’ publications with the timeline of the Napoleonic Wars. My paper claims that Edgeworth’s Belinda demonstrates the fear caused by these wars while Austen’s Persuasion views war as an opportunity, which indicates that the Napoleonic War created these changing ideas in Britain.